Amiee Bryne

Can you start off by introducing yourself and sharing a little bit of background on the work that you do?

Hi hi, my name is Amiee and I'm an Australian living in LA. I moved here 2 and a half years ago and have spent that time styling, making art, props, and ceramic sculptures.

I love to make pieces or create worlds that have a sense of humor. I seem to gravitate towards anything shiny or sparkly.

I made my first disco ball basketball a few years back, no particular reason, I just thought the world needed one!

You’re a jack of all trades/multi disciplinary artist working across various mediums - art direction, prop design, wardrobe styling. How did you fall into the different jobs that you’ve had in the past considering that each project is so different? Do you have a preference?

Back in Australia I studied Visual Merchandising and worked in the field for 17 years, it was a very "jack of all trades" type of career.

I was either designing a store, concepting window displays, using a power tool, dressing mannequins or a lot of the time picking up clothes off the floor.

Every day was different and there were so many different creative elements to the job. It's really helped me with being flexible in art direction, prop design, and wardrobe styling. I love working across all of them!

We are obsessed with the disco basketballs. What inspired you to create these fun designs and how did the Hypebeast/NBA partnership come to fruition?

I made my first disco ball basketball a few years back, no particular reason, I just thought the world needed one!

I usually think of an idea in the shower and then work out a way to make it happen....that's how the first mirror ball basketball happened.

I've worked with Hypebeast in the past and they asked me to come up with some ideas for an event they were hosting with TNT and the NBA. I proposed custom made basketballs referencing the teams that were playing for the event... Lakers and Clippers

They loved the idea. This meant I had to work out a way to deliver what I had promised and that's how the first crystal basketballs happened!

From our conversations in the past, you mentioned you love pop culture references and incorporating some of those inspirations back into art direction or some of your one-off ceramic pieces you’ve created. What are the initial thought processes involved before you decide to commit to a concept considering each project takes so much time to execute?

My thought process for ceramics is seeing useful objects and then recreating them so they become un-useful. Once I get an idea in my head I become incredibly annoying and it's all I can think about and talk about. (it drives my boyfriend insane)

I love the process of working out how I am going to create something that I have never done before. Planning a piece is just as exciting for me as it is creating it.

How has Covid-19 affected your creative process? Has this shifted the way you work or think about the future ideas you want to work on?

It's been tough! My ceramic studio shut down, most of production shut down so it left a lot of spare time at home. In the beginning I didn't really feel like creating anything, it didn't feel right.

After about a month of too many home margaritas and not making anything I started to get the itch again and started plotting 9 foot basketball net installations and decided to put all of my energy into making basketballs.

The whole process has really confirmed that I need to be creating. It makes me very happy :)

Wardrobe styling and prop design requires all hands on deck whether its assistants on set, designers, photographers, etc. If there’s one dream collaborator you’d love to work with, who would it be and why?

The last job I did before the Covid shutdown was actually my dream job/collaboration.

I did the set design for an amazing collaboration between Vans and The Simpsons. I am a HUGE Simpsons fan and I got to build the Simpsons living room and make it come to life.

It was a pretty incredible experience for me!

Oklahoma City Thunder Basketball
Oklahoma City Thunder Basketball

Oklahoma City Thunder Basketball

$500.00
Unit price per

Phil Schade / 1733

Start off by telling us who you are, where you currently live and what your occupation is.

I’m Phil Schade, founder and designer of 1733. I live and work in Chicago, Illinois.

What does the name 1733 stand for and how did you get your start designing / making bags?

1733 is the address number of the house I grew up in Center City, Philadelphia. My parents bought it shortly before I was born and still live there today. It’s a narrow row home on a small block that they (both architects) have continued to renovate and update throughout their time living there. And even though I haven’t lived there in 15 years and my bedroom was changed into an office shortly after I graduated college, I think it will always feel like my home. When picking a name for this brand I latched onto 1733 and it continually reminds me of where I came from, which influences my aesthetic tastes to this day.

After graduating with a degree in mechanical engineering I ended up in IT consulting. I missed working with my hands and began to teach myself how to sew. As I built up a larger portfolio of work I decided to share it under the 1733 name. Bags were a part of those early experiments and as I became a better sewer and designer it became clear that this was an area where I could really be creative and make the kind of work I didn’t see being produced elsewhere.

The bags you create tend to utilize a mix of fabrics. What have been some of the more difficult fabrics you’ve had to work with as well your  favorite?

Leather is the most difficult medium I work with. It can’t be cut well with scissors, the hides are irregularly shaped, you have to work around blemishes, it stretches unpredictably, and it’s unforgiving when sewing. I try to limit how much I use it for those reasons but it has a lot of benefits (durability, unique look, upscale tactility) and some customers really desire it. Many of the different variants of Dyneema Composite Fabric are difficult to work with as well from a cutting and sewing perspective but, again, it performs extremely well and people want that. The bulk of my bags are made from Dimension Polyant X-Pac laminate fabrics and classic woven Cordura nylons, these fabrics are easy to work with, perform great, are available in wide color ranges and are easily accessible for a small shop like mine.

Can you walk us through the process from start to finish on creating a bag for 1733?

I do all my pattern making manually on poster board, and build samples and prototypes through an iterative process. This ensures that the parts of the bag fit together right and I am able to incorporate the functionality I want into an attractive shape. I use my pattern pieces and a variety of cutting tools to cut the material (sometimes using multiple layers, depending how many units of the bag I am making). I also cut trim pieces like webbing and zippers in the early stages of production. Sewing a bag involves making mini-assemblies of the different panels that make it up and then putting together those panels into larger and larger parts until the bag is ready to be closed up. Throughout this process I am performing quality control to make sure there are no loose threads or any damage to the fabric. Typically my bags are assembled inside out until the final sewing operations are completed, and then I flip the whole thing out to see the finished product. Finishing touches in the form of zipper pulls or accessory straps are made and added in the final stages.

What do you enjoy most about the process, is it the design side of it or the manual labor?

Truly I enjoy both equally, they provide a nice balance of different types of problem solving. Sewing a new design that I’ve been thinking about and drawing for months is extremely rewarding as a form of creative expression. But also figuring out the most efficient way to make a batch of that bag and sewing each step 10 or 50 times in a row allows me to feel really attached to the products I am putting out into the world.

But also figuring out the most efficient way to make a batch of that bag and sewing each step 10 or 50 times in a row allows me to feel really attached to the products I am putting out into the world.

In addition to selling your bags through your online store, you also sell to a few select retailers both domestically and internationally. How do you decide on which retailers to partner with?

I try to pick retailers that have a strong and unique point of view and appreciate what it is that I am making. I think it could be easy for someone to glance at my bags and not get what separates them from other brands. A little closer look, and a willingness to dig into my process will justify longer lead times and higher prices. I believe that is why I’ve had some success in the Japanese market, where there is a great appreciation for craftsmanship. I’ve been lucky to find some retailers that really get it and that energizes me to push myself and my designs to create special retailer specific collections. A great example of this is the 3 exclusive collections I’ve done with Hudson, NY retailer Meridian (@meridian.vision)

Outside of creating bags I saw on your site you created a pillow as well as a small run of portable and durable chairs. As your brand continues to grow, do you see yourself continuing to work on and offer similar items?

I love having products that people can appreciate in ways other than just carrying them—I like making things that are artful and that you’ll want to use a lot and keep around. Making 1733 homegoods helps establish a little more of an intimate connection to my customers, since these are more permanent, one-of-a-kind pieces. I also like to use my homegoods line to do more experimental work and collaborate with other artists, which is an important part of the brand—our chair show series and the pillows were made using painted fabric by William J. O’Brien and bring art into the everyday. The chairs will always be a part of 1733 as they fit the inside / outside and form / function scales I am always trying to balance so well…I am also trying to incorporate more clothing products into the brand so I can share other aspects of my design tastes with people.

Photography by 1733, Mary Manning and Scottie Cameron

Gustavo Eandi / Uxe Mentale

Tell us about who you are, where you’re currently located and what your occupation is.

My name is Gustavo Eandi. I was born in Mar del Plata (38°00′S 57°33′O), Argentina, where I am currently based with my wife and son. I am a graphic artist working on graphic design, editorial design, illustration and fashion.

Can you walk us through your creative process and how you pull inspiration into your final work / deadlines? 

The creative process varies according to the project as well as how many projects I am involved in at the time.

I try to work on one project at a time but sometimes I may have up to 3 projects simultaneously. Ideally, I have a limit because the energy that each project takes is a lot, and my work days are long. I spend one day thinking, drawing by hand if necessary but I also work with Photoshop or Adobe Illustrator to throw out the first ideas. I also look through my archive (on paper or digital) in search of clues. What emerges from that first day is usually not definitive, but crucial. For works that carry a certain complexity, it’s convenient for me to let those ideas “rest” for about a day and then see them in perspective. That helps to take away vices and obviousness. Sometimes I solve the job the day after…but ideally (if the deadline allows it) I prefer to repeat that "rest" process a few more times.

In these stages of "detaching" from the image to see them in perspective, sometimes the client is involved (asking them for first impressions) but mainly I check those sketches with my relatives. Inspiration appears slowly but clearly in the work process. Spending days thinking about it, being aware of everything that appears or happens to me outside my studio and take it back with me the next day.

I could say the work itself is my strongest source of inspiration.

Affinity and admiration. Friendship and admiration. Sometimes money.

How do you decide on what type of projects you select, given that you’ve worked on a various range of projects with clients such as NTS, BONE SODA, BRAIN DEAD and Tame Impala?

Affinity and admiration. Friendship and admiration. Sometimes money.

If you could go back to the younger version of yourself / start of your career, what advice would you give yourself knowing the ups and down of a competitive industry? 

I don’t think I could  give advice to anybody…my younger self included. I still have a lot of learning to do. The one thing I do know is I love this type of work..I really enjoy it. If you love your work and you have the chance to dedicate your time doing it, that’s a lot to be thankful for. Enjoy it, don’t run.

You've done a fair amount of work for the record label, Stones Throw Records. Do you remember the first commissioned job you did for the label and how your relationship with them has grown over the years?

This year marks the 10th anniversary of my first job with Stones Throw Records and Jeff Jank, (Artistic Director for Stones Throw Records).

The first job Jeff and I worked on together was for the vinyl edition release of Madlib’s Medicine Show #1: Before The Verdict.

Prior to my first job with Stones Throw Records, I had submitted a drawing of the rapper MF DOOM to a Stones Throw email address, along with a link to my Flickr page. The response I received was from Jeff asking if I wanted to submit some drawings for the Madlib album series they were beginning to work on. This ended up being the Madlib Medicine Show and the albums were released monthly (13 in total), of which 4 or 5 I worked on. From that moment on every year we’ve worked together on one or a few albums together. 

Uxe Mentale Cap - Sage
Uxe Mentale Cap - Sage
Uxe Mentale Cap - Sage
Uxe Mentale Cap - Sage

Uxe Mentale Cap - Sage

$45.00
Unit price per

I could say the work itself is my strongest source of inspiration.

I read somewhere that you grew up skateboarding and immersed yourself in the skating culture at a young age. When you first got your start as a designer / illustrator was skate culture a big inspiration for you when designing and is it still till this day?

During the early 90s in Argentina, skate culture was small (like me at the time) and in Mar del Plata it was very restricted. My friends attended a catholic school and did not skate…also the boards were very expensive. So my first interaction was not with a skateboard, but with the graphics from skate magazines that I purchased downtown at newspaper kiosks. Magazines like Thrasher and Transworld and their advertisements for Girl and Shorty’s (with Rosa Esperanza Gonzalez) but mainly a skate magazine from Basque Country (north of Spain) magazine called Tres60 Skate, written in Spanish. (this drawing from my show “Discipline” in 2013 is based on a page from that magazine). I remember the change from flat nose to double-kick in that magazine. The 80’s becoming the 90’s.

Tres60 Skate was short-lived (it’s last issue was #17, with only a few pages but epic)…then Big Brother appeared (on this side of the Atlantic), continuing and increasing that impudence, with politically incorrect content, almost porn for my age.

All this happened during my youth from when I was 10 years old, up until I was 16. So yes, it had and and still has a great impact on my work, my aesthetics and my interests.

During these times of sheltering in place, do you find yourself still being productive and creating work as you normally would or has it become more of challenge to produce new work?

It's becoming very difficult to be productive…but I don't feel bad about it. Most of what we visually consume is affected by this situation. Personally I am not interested in the content being generated at this time. There is a general analysis of everything. Analysis of what we "are", but mainly what we “will be" (!) I don't feel like being part of that analysis. I don't think it's time to think about it. We have to be aware, yes, but try to pass it as lightly as possible, so as not to lose our head.

Uxe Mentale Cap - Rust
Uxe Mentale Cap - Rust
Uxe Mentale Cap - Rust
Uxe Mentale Cap - Rust

Uxe Mentale Cap - Rust

$45.00
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When working on a new project do you have your go to songs / albums you prefer listening to while working or are you more of a mixtape / playlist type of guy?

I usually listen to NTS whilst working... My favorite shows are the ones from Carla Dal Forno, Beatrice Dillon, Helm, Freedom To Spend, The Trilogy Tapes, and especially the one from Mark Leckey.

I recommend a great guest show from my friend (and Uxe Mentale collaborator) Aylu, from last march: Intempestivas.

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Uxe Mentale Cap - Sage Linen
Uxe Mentale Cap - Sage Linen
Uxe Mentale Cap - Sage Linen
Uxe Mentale Cap - Sage Linen

Uxe Mentale Cap - Sage Linen

$45.00
Unit price per